So much for “Love thy Neighbor”

Larimer County is on the raggedy edge of maintaining our state exemption allowing our current level (I know, not great, but more than we’d be allowed otherwise) of business, bar, and restaurant openings as it is with campus opening back up.

Christian Leader Sean Feucht’s Visits To Fort Collins And Colorado Springs Worry Health Officials

Now we have the religious folk, who don’t even live here coming in, ignoring what we’re trying to do, then moving on to let us deal with the consequences. Outside agitators of the religious type.

Anyone who knows me well knows that I’m not of organized religion. I’ve got no problems with anyone practicing their own religion, as long as it doesn’t affect others.

This is just another example to be added to my overflowing bag of religious types using their “god” to push their personal beliefs then move on leaving the damage behind.

Simply put, “Love thy neighbor” in my world means not getting them sick.

Presidential Thoughts

What could more profoundly vindicate the idea of America than plain and humble people –- unsung, the downtrodden, the dreamers not of high station, not born to wealth or privilege, not of one religious tradition but many, coming together to shape their country’s course? 

What greater expression of faith in the American experiment than this, what greater form of patriotism is there than the belief that America is not yet finished, that we are strong enough to be self-critical, that each successive generation can look upon our imperfections and decide that it is in our power to remake this nation to more closely align with our highest ideals?

Remarks by the President at the 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery Marches
The First Family waits with former President George W. Bush, former First Lady Laura Bush prior to the walking across the Edmund Pettus Bridge

President Barack Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama and daughters Sasha and Malia wait with former President George W. Bush, former First Lady Laura Bush prior to the walking across the Edmund Pettus Bridge to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches, in Selma, Alabama, March 7, 2015. (Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson)

Cue the hatery (should commentry ensue)

The numbers state that in 2015, the US had over 33,000 opioid deaths. For this, our elected president declared a “national emergency” (yet nothing seems to have been done). 

Compare that with the 30,000  a year in the US from gun violence. Yet again, nothing’s to be done. It’s not just this president, it’s been this way at least since I could vote. The sophists we elected choose to offer hollow words rather than solid actions.

This comes to my mind this morning as I listen to the sound of gunfire this morning on NPR,  brought to us from folk’s video in Las Vegas. It’s a sound I’m intimately familiar with, as well as the effects on the human body. 

I turned off the radio, not my usual action on a Sunday morning. At a point in my life, I volunteered for a job that exposed me to such things so I could better myself with college. I made a choice, others who chose not to make that choice should not have to be exposed to such things. That, to me, is America. You can choose what and what not to do. 

Yet, we’ve become too accepting of death. The vice-president speaks to the mourning and tells them we “are united in our resolve to end such evil in our time,” but the talking heads prove we are not. The casusists will drown out reason with purchased words. 

Once again we hear “It was a tragedy of unimaginable proportions.” Just like the last one. Just like Columbine. Just like Newtown. Just like Aurora.  Just like Orlando. Sadly, it’s become far too imaginable.  

Yet, to speak of any of this publicly will heap scorn and threats upon the writers, even if all we do is ask ” what can we do?”

Spending most of my life in the West, I’ve a more then passing acquaintance with guns. There’s a purpose out here. Hunting for food; defense from dangerous critters who mean us harm while in the hills. But there also needs to be a reasonable limit. But for this topic, reason seems to be slapped down by polemics. 

Seems like it’s time, let see how that goes…

Having been surprised to see that I actually have a Blog, I thought I might be time to get off my bum and try some writery in the public venue.

So, here we are, “on the raggedy edge” so to speak, giving it a shot again, seeing if our words resonate with even my own self once I see how they look on that interwebby thing.

I don’t expect to see myself writing much, especially based off the fact that my previous post was from the early 2000s, but we’ll see if the wordery flows. Been needing another hobby, this seems like an easy way to go. As much as I end up trying to weave tales and entertain folk out in the bars, this may be a nice little way too keep myself entertained.

I’ll even try adding a photo. I believe looking at my writing Nook you understand why there may have been a bit of a gap.

2017-10-07 15.31.32

Another Tavern for Old Town?

The word just came down…the Purple Martini will not be allowed a liquor license. As a resident in Old Town, I don’t feel any sadness. A ten-thousand square foot bar, open primarily at night, this in my mind does not promote growth for a downtown region that already has some problems remaining vital. Currently, the retail to restaurant ration is too far skewed, and this would not help out the longevity, or the sustainability, of Old Town. Two days of liquor hearings have balanced that fact out.

A lot of the testimony that’s come out, I agree with, especially living down here. There are too many problems concurrent with the current ratio–broken windows, obnoxious ambulators, various offal on our properties and business steps. Something we’ve come to accept living down here, but not one we care to encourage.

The interesting part was sharing details with our Denver relatives for Thansgiving..the very same “young professionals” that the bar was trying to lure in. In Denver, even in LoDo, where the young professionals thrive, the Purple martini had to move on due to lack of business…in a climate very similar in ratio to Fort Collins, but very dissimilar in wages and employment. Yet this bar was going to gain this cleintele. Sadly, I, and apparently many others saw the same future here for the bar, one where the owners will need to cater to the college crowd, which tends, historically, to be the root of many alcohol related problems here. Want more evidence? Ask the owner of the Crown Pub, who at one point, when he opened, told the newspaper that they wouldn’t allow the “Blue-jean, blue collar crowd” in. That has changed to keep the bar open. Even my friends down at Lucky Joe’s, who were aiming for the twenty-five and older crowd had to come to a realization that to earn money in Fort Collins as a bar, one must consider and include the college crowd’s disposable income, for they’re the only one’s who don’t watch their money as tightly.

To top it off, the manager of the Purple Martini stated, “You can bet I’m going to keep my eye on the city. The minute the gavel pounds down in favor of another liquor license down there, I’m calling my attorney about a lawsuit.” I believe the residents and business owners down here have but one response, “thank you!”
Couple of links from our local “newspaper”

Day One    Day Two    Day Three    Final?